Monthly Archives: July 2014

Anti-Autism Prejudice: Media, Parents, and Damaged Children

a MUST read for all parents
“In fact, there continues to be extreme ignorance about autism, and autism-awareness efforts still obviously matter. They just need to be improved. Perhaps a synthesis can take place, in which autism-acceptance outreach and marketing campaigns are languaged, framed, and disseminated in ways that foster basic awareness, as well.

But autism advocates are also utterly right in their condemnation of lowest-common-denominator approaches as unacceptable, based on the idea that spreading any message about autism increases awareness and thus is beneficial. This leads to marketing based, sympathy-inducing storytelling that assumes autism as burden and curse to raise awareness and, often, money.

These marketing organizations think they’re not just doing no harm but actually doing good. But they usually are closed-minded and won’t truly listen to or consider contrary perspectives that might improve the work they do.

Anti-autism prejudice is damaging no matter the intentions, no matter how much money is raised, no matter how many views or clicks an article receives online.”

Ray Hemachandra @ Golden Moon Publishing

Nicholas HemachandraMy son, Nicholas, was featured on the cover of the major western North Carolina weekly — the Mountain Xpress — a couple of weeks ago and the cover is, without question, The Best Cover Ever. Featuring a photograph by Tim Robison and art design by Megan Kirby, it’s something to frame for Nicholas’ lifetime.

Also, and sadly this part appeals to me, if I put it in a frame I won’t read the Mountain Xpress article, in which my family and two other families are profiled, again. And Nicholas won’t be able to read it, either.

When you’re unhappy with a piece you’re featured in, it’s always disorienting. You inevitably get lots of enthusiastic response from people who care about you and who think press coverage is a kind of special honor — mixed with upset response from people who care about you and know better.

You want to…

View original post 3,788 more words

Advertisements

7 Things I Never Thought I’d Say Before I Became a Parent

Once upon a time, long, long ago, in a city far, far away (well a 45 minute commute anyway) I had a life. It was civilized, and people spoke politely to each other (with the exception of road rage) and we never spoke of body parts unless we were drunk or laughing at some celebrity who forgot she wasn’t wearing underpants. It was peaceful there. And drinks at noon were cool.

Then I became a parent.

black mini van parked in my driveway

black mini van parked in my driveway

And I found myself saying all manner of strange things. Things that once repulsed me were now topics of everyday conversation. In fact, I often find myself desperately seeking some adult conversation. A mere sentence or two that has nothing to do with the contents of one’s diaper or where the damn permission form has gotten to now.

When I stop to think about it, some of the things I’ve said are pretty horrifying. So, just to brighten your day a bit (as you revel in not having to say those things, or that you managed to escape them), I thought I’d share with you some of the most awful things I’ve found myself saying:

7.  A mini-van? Really?

6.  Yes, someone needs to be sober in the house at all times.

5.  No the baby doesn’t count.

4.  Oh, that diaper smells delightful! Think we can make it home without causing another rash? That mom over there is about to ram us for our spot.

3.  Seriously? You’re picking your nose and eating it? At the table? Instead of this dinner I slaved over?

2.  I know it’s fashionable to wear tight shorts, but honey, do you know what camel toe is?

1.  Sure I can take three more kids in the van. Pile them in!